The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, reviewed by Caleb Lawson

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

From Amazon.com:

In 1922, F Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new-something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald’s finest work and certainly the book for which he his best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author’s generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s-and his country’s-most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter-tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther… And one fine morning–” Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

Imagine yourself living the dream, fortune, fame, but missing the only thing you truly care about, true love. This is the feeling that millionaire Jay Gatsby has to live with. He has everything you could ever dream of: a huge mansion in New York, millions of dollars, and large amounts of fame. The only thing he is missing is his one true love. In this 20th century literary classic, The Great Gatsby, my three favorite points were the vocabulary, the protagonist, and the plot.

In The Great Gatsby, the vocabulary was obviously of the early 20th century. This book was first published in 1925 and is set in 1922. Through the use of the wonderful period vocabulary, I was able to really immerse myself into this book. The vocabulary was very adult, however this did not make the book difficult to read. The Great Gatsby enlarged my vocabulary greatly. I love the way this book was written and would not change a word.

Another one of my favorite points was the protagonist, the one and only Jay Gatsby. Gatsby, apart from being one of the wealthiest men in America, was a very relatable character. The one thing he wanted was the one thing he could not have, true love, Daisy Buchanan. Gatsby had an adventurous life from a very young age. He ran away from home when he was only a teenager. After living a very impoverished life, he decided to join the army. He first met daisy at a military ball at Daisy’s house. Gatsby was instantly enchanted. When he left to fight overseas, Daisy got married to another man, Tom Buchanan. Gatsby was very jealous of Tom and would do anything he could to get Daisy back. Gatsby’s jealousy eventually led to his downfall.

My third favorite point of the novel was the plot. The plot is something that nearly everyone who has loved and lost can relate to. It is about the longing for something you can not have. This plot was very enticing and had no slow points. It always keeps you guessing and is never predictable. Nick Carraway, our narrator, rents a house in Long Island next to the phantasmagorical mansion of the millionaire Jay Gatsby. Gatsby is famous for throwing magnificent parties. It is known that no one is actually invited to these parties, they just kind of show up. One afternoon Nick receives an invitation to one of his parties, the only invitation Gatsby has ever given. When Nick starts attending more and more of Gatsby’s parties he discovers the true meaning of them. Gatsby is hoping that Daisy, a past love, will show up. When Gatsby finally does manage to meet with Daisy, things do not go quite as expected. After their first meeting in five years, things slowly start to fall apart for our protagonist, Jay Gatsby, and his love, Daisy Buchanan.

Overall I really enjoyed this novel. I would definitely recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys a good classic book. This book is a very sobering tale of the real world and how love may not always be what you expected. F. Scott Fitzgerald has written a true classic of the twentieth-century. Though I enjoyed the entire novel, my three favorite points were the vocabulary, protagonist, and the plot.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: